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Home What's New Obituary | Sickness The passing away of Dr G N Reddy

The passing away of Dr G N Reddy

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Dear Johnnites,

It is with profound sadness that I request you to join the Johnnite family in mourning the passing away of Dr G.N. Reddy, FRCP, early this morning. He was 82, and had been battling Progressive Supranuclear Palsy for the past few years.

Dr G.N. Reddy was Professor & Head of the Department of Medicine at St. John's till 1981. A passionate teacher, all of us who had the fortune of learning under him will remember his punctuality, impeccable bedside manners, commitment to teaching and empathy for patients. It was the usual sight for students to find him at a patient's bedside at 08.25 sharp for a clinic that was to start at 08.30. Clinics were 3 hours, and Tutorials were 2 hours long - every time, and no compromise. He would have take great pains to explain the patient that he/she would be examined several times, and he would have every student examine the patient until the sign had been picked-up.

Cardiology was a putative speciality those days, and he painstakingly demonstrated signs, murmurs, clicks and thrills. He had equipped himself with ECG's of various conditions, and these would be the first introduction to electrocardiography for all of us. The crowning event of every batch's first medicine posting in his unit would come when he would assemble a big brown box and have us listen to the various cardiac sounds and murmurs - those were the days of the phonocardiogram, and ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY was a decade away.

His etiquette and ethics wee exemplary. Rounds would start in the general ward, and time was of no consequence for finishing the same. The Muniammas and the Krishnappas of the world got as much of his attention as the well turned out elite of Bangalore - of whom most would be his patients. SHO's in the CCU in St. Martha's will remember him for the promptness with which he would arrive in the middle of the night to attend to a patient on their call - he would come in his suit even at that hour. Not once had he shown annoyance with the SHO - even when the call was a consequence of the resident's anxiety or inexperience rather than of the patient's seriousness. An the next morning, he would be ready for his clinics - you guessed right, at 08.25!

He was personal physician to the Chief Minister and Governor, a member of the University Senate and Academic Council. He was examiner to several universities, and an Advisor to the Governor.

As an internal examiner, his ability to bully the external into being considerate to his students was legendary - the most common "line" being ".....da da da da.....how can you fail my best student in the last 5 years I say...." leaving the external with no choice but to agree.

The love he had for the students of St. John's survived the turbulent saga of his final months in St. John's - he and the management had developed irreconcilable differences. By the time he came as examiner for the last time, he had already demitted office in St. John's. But he gave the Batch of 1976 a 100% pass in Medicine at the University exams.

There was a reconciliation of sorts with St. John's many years later, but for all his students he remained the one reference point for professionalism, bedside etiquette, medical ethics and commitment to teaching. The first 14 batches will always have a special place in their hearts for "G.N.R".

Let us pray for his repose.
Mohan A Prof of urology

Dear batch mates

received a telephone call from dr prem jayarajan informing me of the
passing away of our prof of medicine, Dr G N Reddy, in the early hours of this morning.
i do not know the final cause of the demise, but we did know that he had been
suffering from alzhimers and parkinsons for the past couple of years.
may his soul rest in peace.
i request any 1 of U to please write a tribute to this departed soul.

c s rajan


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